Clinical Trials

Current Open Clinical Trials

Clinical research is the foundation upon which successful patient treatment rests. Our radiation oncologists conduct studies to determine new and better ways to use proton therapy, and to make these benefits available to more patients.

LLUMC currently has openings in clinical trials for patients with certain types of cancers of the esophagus, liver, pancreas, and prostate, as well as those with soft-tissue sarcoma. All trials noted below involve the use of proton therapy and have been approved by the Institutional Review Board at LLUMC, the independent ethics committee that oversees such trials and which holds a Federal-Wide Assurance with the U.S. Office for Human Research Protection and the Food and Drug Administration.

The use of proton beam radiation as a cancer treatment was developed and brought to use by scientists at LLUMC more than 20 years ago. Since that time the James M. Slater, MD Proton Treatment and Research Center has cared for more than 18,000 cancer patients, making it the most dynamic and experienced proton treatment center in the world.

Current trials to which qualified patients can join include:

Esophageal Cancer Proton Therapy Clinical Trial

This trial studies whether a combination of chemotherapy can work with a low proton dose to control disease and prolong survival. Principal investigator: Gary Yang, MD For details, please consult the study Proton Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

Liver Cancer & Tumors Proton Therapy Clinical Trial

Proton treatment at LLUMC is effective in reducing tumors in liver cancers that meet Milan and San Francisco criteria. Currently trans-arterial chemoembolization (TACE) is a standard treatment for these patients. This study compares proton therapy outcomes with results in patients treated with TACE, in hopes of potentially improving overall treatment outcomes. Principal investigators: David A. Bush, MD and Michael De Vera, MD. For details, please consult the study Transarterial Chemoembolization Versus Beam Radiotherapy for the Treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

Advanced Liver Cancer Proton Therapy Clinical Trial

Sorafenib is a standard chemotherapy for treating patients with advanced liver cancers. This study will determine if adding proton therapy to that chemotherapy can significantly reduce tumor volumes. Principal investigators: David A. Bush, MD and Michael De Vera, MD. For details, please consult the study Proton Beam Radiotherapy Plus Sorafenib Versus Sorafenib for Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma Exceeding San Francisco Criteria.

Liver Metastases Proton Therapy Clinical Trial

For tumors that have metastasized to the liver and cannot be treated with surgery, aggressive radiotherapy can prolong survival. Proton therapy can potentially improve clinical outcomes with less morbidity. This trial studies the feasibility and safety of using protons for isolated liver metastases. Principal investigator: Gary Yang, MD. For details, please consult the study Proton Therapy in the Treatment of Liver Metastases.

Pancreatic Cancer Proton Therapy Clinical Trial

When diagnosed, pancreatic cancer typically is advanced, making chemotherapy and conventional radiation more difficult to use. This study will research whether a limited proton dose can reduce tumor volumes, minimize side effects, and make chemotherapy more effective. Principal investigator: Gary Yang, MD For details, please consult the study Chemotherapy Plus Proton-chemotherapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

Prostate Cancer Proton Therapy Clinical Trial

Proton treatments at LLUMC have long been successful controlling disease and reducing side effects for prostate cancer patients. This study looks at shortening treatment time from eight to four weeks. Principal investigator: Jerry D. Slater, MD. For details, please consult the study Hypofractionated Proton Beam Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

Soft Tissue Sarcoma Clinical Trial

Surgery is the preferred method of controlling soft-tissue sarcomas; standard radiation may be used to reduce tumors so surgery is more effective.  However, radiation-injured normal tissue can compromise surgery. This trial will look at whether proton therapy, by sparing more normal tissue, can increase surgery’s effectiveness. Principal investigator: Gary Yang, MD For details, please consult the study A Phase II Trial of Preoperative Proton Therapy in Soft-tissue Sarcomas of the Extremities and Body Wall.